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Triumph’s 400cc Models Revealed

Image source: Triumph UK

It’s a market that ‘new’ Triumph (when do you think we can stop calling them ‘new’?) has never tackled but one that is assuming increasing importance not just in Asia but around the world. The market is the sub-500cc market and Triumph has finally committed to it after a couple of false starts over the past ten years.

The new Speed 400 roadster and Scrambler 400 X models fit into Triumph’s ‘modern classic’ range and are, in effect, ‘baby’ versions of the Speed Twin 900 and the Scrambler 900.

Image source: Triumph UK

They are powered by a brand new DOHC, four-valve, fuel injection 398cc, liquid-cooled single cylinder engine, called the TR-Series, developing 39.5bhp and 37Nm of torque, figures that put it on a par with KTM’s 390 models. Wet weight is 170 – 179kg, depending on the model chosen. Service intervals are an impressive 16,000km.

Image source: Triumph UK

The Speed 400 features large 43mm big-piston upside-down front forks, mono-shock rear suspension with an external reservoir, lightweight 17-inch wheels and roadster-specific geometry and wheelbase. Four-piston radial front brakes with a 300mm front disc handle stopping duties up front.

Image source: Triumph UK

The Scrambler 400 X features a longer wheelbase, longer travel suspension, a larger 19-inch front wheel, a larger cast steel brake pedal and high-grip foot pegs that are positioned lower and wider also make for a more natural standing riding position when riding off-road, with a larger 320mm front brake disc.

Image source: Triumph UK

Electronically, there is a ride-by-wire throttle, traction control and ABS: TC is switchable on both models, while the ABS can be turned off at the rear on the Scrambler. The dash is a combined analogue/digital affair, while all lighting is LED.

Image source: Triumph UK

They look exactly like their larger stablemates and, if previous practice is adhered to, quality promises to be at the premium end of the market, with little concession to budget constraints. Having said that, expect the two models to be competitively priced.

Image source: Triumph UK

This class of motorcycle is largely aimed at the Indian and Asian markets but should find ready acceptance in other territories. They have been developed as part of Triumph’s partnership with Indian giant Bajaj, but they will be built in Triumph’s factories in Thailand and Brazil, while Bajaj will build the bikes that will go on sale in India later this year. The rest of the world will get them in early 2024.

Image source: Triumph UK
Harry Fisher
Harry Fisher
Harry has been obsessing about motorbikes for over 45 years, riding them for 38 years and writing and talking about them for 13 years. In that time, he has ridden everything from an Aprilia to a Zundapp, from the 1920s to the 2020s. His favourites are the ones that didn’t break down and leave him stranded. While he loves the convenience of modern bikes, he likes nothing better than getting his hands dirty keeping old bikes running, just as long as it’s not by the roadside! Old enough to know better and young enough not to care, he knows you don’t stop riding when you get old, you get old when you stop riding.
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