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HomeZA BikersBike ReviewsA New Dawn for Husqvarna and its 2024 Enduro Model Range

A New Dawn for Husqvarna and its 2024 Enduro Model Range

Photo credit: ZCMC Media

After attending the spectacular 2024 KTM Enduro launch in Lesotho, it wasn’t a massive surprise to see a completely new Enduro range come from Husqvarna. Without much time in between we received an invite to the local launch of the new range, no not updated, new. Just like the international Husqvarna Enduro launch that took place in Norway, the South African Importers organised a similar experience for us all to enjoy.

How does a bike launch on a ferry, chartering through Hartebeespoort Dam during sunset sound? Yes, pretty impressive, setting an awesome scene for an impressive 95% new range of blue, yellow and white Enduro models. Grant Frerichs removed the covers off of a decked-out TE model for us motorcycle media and dealers to take in. The new bike can only be described as jaw-droppingly beautiful, just hubba hubba from head to toe.

Photo credit: ZCMC Media

Running through the bike Grant pointed out a lot of new and not much of old left on the latest mountain goats. Yes, it’s easier to talk about what hasn’t changed, in fact, all that’s left from the old bikes are the wheels and a few hard-to-tells. Just when we thought the 2023 models were going to be hard to replace, Husqvarna blew the 23s out of the water with major advancements. The new livery is one of the eye-catchers with modern, Swedish-inspired graphics on the new and sharper-looking bodywork, featuring stunning yellow details on the rear tail mudguard and the plastics under the front headlight.

Photo credit: ZCMC Media

What’s new then? Across all seven machines we see a new chromium molybdenum steel frame, closed-cartridge spring WP forks, redesigned WP XACT shock, refined bodywork, LED headlight, all-new lightweight 2-piece subframe, wider footpegs, new triple clamp, lighter swingarm, enhanced BRAKTEC brakes, GSK discs, a combined start/stop button, ProTaper handlebars, Michelin Enduro tyres and a totally independent OCU, which replaces the use of electronic fuses and relays.

Photo credit: ZCMC Media

We also see TPI fall away to TBI on the two strokes, which now allow for two different engine maps, selectable via an optional Map Select switch. On the FE models, we now see an optional addition of traction control and for the first time for a Husqvarna Enduro machine, a quick-shifter function. The FE 250 and FE 350 machines also benefit from new and much more compact DOHC engines.

Photo credit: Husqvarna

What are the top two enhancements on the new generation Enduros? Hands down it has to be the all-new 48 mm WP XACT Closed Cartridge fork and new electronic “Throttle Body Injection” technology on the two strokes. What this means is, the closed cartridge spring forks incorporate a mid-valve piston for smooth action and consistent performance while a hydro-stop in the final 68 mm of travel helps to maintain forward momentum. This has really taken, not just the Husky but KTM, from a head-down tail-up ride to a balance and level ride, where before most top riders would dial up the front preload to match the rear. Making matters easier, both the fork and shock settings can be adjusted by hand for a fast and easy personalised set-up.

Photo credit: ZCMC Media

Hearing about new two-stroke technology and development really gets the hairs on my arms standing, it’s just so awesome to see a manufacturer taking a closer look at these high-performance motors when the rest are thinking EV. The new throttle body injection technology provides carburettor-like smooth power delivery while eliminating the need for re-jetting at different altitudes. Contributing to smoother power delivery and increased power is the electric power valve, which is controlled according to the throttle position and engine RPMs. In my opinion, these upgrades take the new enduro range to the next level for both pro and average riding levels.

Photo credit: ZCMC Media

With the presentation out of the way, we rolled our way down to Blue Groove for a 10 km hard Enduro loop. With only one day, very technical terrain and a bunch of riders to swap bikes with, we didn’t all get the chance to ride the full range of bikes or set up the suspension properly. So, I managed to swing a leg over the TE 150 and FE 250 on the outride during the launch day.

Photo credit: ZCMC Media

However, with Husqvarna and KTM continuing their customer-involvement commitments by encouraging their dealers to make use of the demo fleet, we got the opportunity to swing a leg over a few more Enduros at the Biker’s Warehouse Demo day at Blue Groove. Yes, just a few days later Biker’s Warehouse had the same bikes at the same location (a shorter route of 3 km), giving media, potential buyers and the public the opportunity to ride the latest Huskies. Even with a massive 80-rider turnout and a well-laid-out route by the team, I managed to swing a leg over the TE 250, TE 300 and FE 350.

Photo credit: ZA Bikers

The first thing that you notice on the new bikes is how light and nimble they feel. A light and nimble bike always makes for a really fun and confidence-inspiring package to push really hard on. With all the frames and suspension components across the range receiving some serious upgrades, I felt myself riding more on the balls of my feet than before, which made a massive difference when riding technical—a very natural riding position.

The only bike that I rode and found to be a challenge to ride was the TE 150 and that’s mostly because you can’t be lazy on the throttle or clutch. However, considering that the piston is as small as a baby’s fist, it has a decent bottom end for a two-stroke. If you have the skill to keep the little monster singing, it is hugely rewarding to ride, but unfortunately, I don’t. Riding in the higher RPMs has to be your riding style otherwise you and the 150 will not be best mates on an Enduro.

Photo credit: ZA Bikers

The TE 250 and TE 300 were godsent, they made you feel like a legend at times with their diesel-like low-revving lug. The 250 and 300 share a lot, not just chassis-wise but engine internals too, like the clutch and gearbox. Although the 300 has been the king of Enduro, I really enjoyed and actually preferred riding the 250. The reason for this is the 250 is just so much more forgiving and lighter, especially when you are in the more technical sections and like myself, lack a certain amount of skill.

However, what I do like about the 300 is how you can ride between second and third gear in the technical sections, while on the 250 you’d have to be in second and sometimes first. A stand-out feature for me on both the 250 and 300 is the suspension, which works exceptionally well, allowing for some hard-charging without feeling like you’ve left the rest behind. The ride actually felt more balanced and plusher on the two big bore two-strokes compared to the TE 150. Having the new rear fairing design, which flairs out, helped me a lot when having to squeeze the bike with my legs while approaching obstacles.

Photo credit: ZA Bikers

Just like the TE 250 and 300 two-strokes the FE 250 and 350 four-strokes share a lot, but in my opinion, they couldn’t be any more different. The extra 100cc really does make all the difference, those extra ponies for the up-and-coming riders give you a bike you can be competitive on and also grow into. I feathered the clutch half as much on the 350 compared to the 250, which for me makes a massive difference when the Grim Reaper of riding fatigue and arm pump shows his fangs. Luckily the quick-shifter along with the open sections of Blue Groove could help with this on the 250.

Speaking to the other guys at the launch and demo day, a lot of them would choose the FE 350 out of the range—it’s just a dirt bike that makes logical sense. It’s got the power, it’s nimble, it can keep up with the FE 450 and even the FE 501 with a good rider on the pegs, and it feels as light as the FE 250. On the technical climbs, the 350 tractors along everything in second and third with no effort at all. If you want a fun bike and a bike that you can go racing competitively on, then go 350.

Photo credit: ZA Bikers

So, there you have it. Obviously, these are just riding impressions gleaned from a day’s riding, but believe us when we say that these 2024 Husqvarna’s do not disappoint! The all-around technical and real-world brilliance of these bikes shines through. I’m quite keen on spending some time on the TE 250, to really experience a whole new world of Enduro.

Husqvarna 2024 Enduro Range

For more information on the bikes featured in this article, click on the links below…

2024

Husqvarna FE 501

Pricing From R177,699 (RRP)


Brand: Husqvarna
2024

Husqvarna FE 450

Pricing From R174,699 (RRP)


Brand: Husqvarna
2024

Husqvarna FE 350

Pricing From R172,699 (RRP)


Brand: Husqvarna
2024

Husqvarna FE 250

Pricing From R169,699 (RRP)


Brand: Husqvarna
2024

Husqvarna TE 300

Pricing From R173,699 (RRP)


Brand: Husqvarna
2024

Husqvarna TE 250

Pricing From R165,699 (RRP)


Brand: Husqvarna
2024

Husqvarna TE 150

Pricing From R142,699 (RRP)


Brand: Husqvarna
Bjorn Moreira
Bjorn Moreira
My name is Bjorn Moreira (Senior Editor at ZA Lifestyle) and I always long for the next adventure. Why yes this may be a problem, but I’m what you call a #LIFEAHOLIC which I have been since my very first breath. My passion leads me to enjoy capturing memories on camera, riding motorcycles, cycling and spending as much time as possible in the great outdoors.
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